disabled students allowance dsa case studies

Case Studies: David

David knew he needed support from a young age, and received an unofficial diagnosis when he was in secondary school. Without an official diagnosis, however, little support was offered and funding issues meant no more than additional time in exams and a reader and scribe.

David decided to go to University after school as he felt that this was a ‘natural progression’. Amongst the anxiety, the course also wasn’t the right fit, and he decided to drop out and spend time working. It was during this time whilst training staff where David decided to study education at University and further develop his chosen career path.

“I knew that I struggled, but didn’t know why I was struggling. From getting support and being shown different ways to complete assignments, I now know my weak point and how to get through them.”

David was aware of his weak points and questioned if he would be able to keep up. He needn’t have worried as his disability was immediately flagged up by the correct services and he had a seamless journey with an Education Psychologist and a formal diagnosis, before being introduced to A2B for his Study Needs Assessment.

David

David describes the process with A2B as a bit daunting to begin with but it was ‘nice and friendly and a space to explain where some of his problems may be’. David felt heard during his assessment. The next steps were clearly laid out and he knew what he needed to do. Having an assessor he could contact directly gave the experience a nice personal touch.

Receiving DSA support had a positive impact on David. His anxiety eased and the strategies in place meant that the pressure was removed. Without the support, David feels that he would have missed more lectures and wouldn’t have the marks he now has. He currently is on target for a high 2:1 level. He has become more organised, confident and can pace his work more easily.

Advice
David’s main advice to students is to be open-minded towards disability support. Many students aren’t aware of what they’re struggling with and this is an opportunity to take on any or all the support offered whilst they find their way through their disability. “I knew that I struggled, but didn’t know why I was struggling. From getting support and being shown different ways to complete assignments, I now know my weak point and how to get through them.”

Case Studies: David

David knew he needed support from a young age, and received an unofficial diagnosis when he was in secondary school. Without an official diagnosis, however, little support was offered and funding issues meant no more than additional time in exams and a reader and scribe.

David decided to go to University after school as he felt that this was a ‘natural progression’. Amongst the anxiety, the course also wasn’t the right fit, and he decided to drop out and spend time working. It was during this time whilst training staff where David decided to study education at University and further develop his chosen career path.

David

David was aware of his weak points and questioned if he would be able to keep up. He needn’t have worried as his disability was immediately flagged up by the correct services and he had a seamless journey with an Education Psychologist and a formal diagnosis, before being introduced to A2B for his Study Needs Assessment.

David describes the process with A2B as a bit daunting to begin with but it was ‘nice and friendly and a space to explain where some of his problems may be’. David felt heard during his assessment. The next steps were clearly laid out and he knew what he needed to do. Having an assessor he could contact directly gave the experience a nice personal touch.

Receiving DSA support had a positive impact on David. His anxiety eased and the strategies in place meant that the pressure was removed. Without the support, David feels that he would have missed more lectures and wouldn’t have the marks he now has. He currently is on target for a high 2:1 level. He has become more organised, confident and can pace his work more easily.

Advice
David’s main advice to students is to be open-minded towards disability support. Many students aren’t aware of what they’re struggling with and this is an opportunity to take on any or all the support offered whilst they find their way through their disability. “I knew that I struggled, but didn’t know why I was struggling. From getting support and being shown different ways to complete assignments, I now know my weak point and how to get through them.”

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