disabled students allowance dsa case studies

Case Studies: Grace

During the registration process, Grace noted that she suffered from depression and anxiety. The Disability services at the University contacted Grace and suggested that she apply for the DSA. Despite her struggles, to the point of deferring her course by a year, Grace didn’t feel it was necessary to apply for the DSA until her third year.

“With my depression, it leads to negative thinking, and I assumed the assessment would be a complete waste of my time”. Grace became very nervous and anxious about the assessment process, so she booked the next available appointment with A2B Assessments. Within minutes of her telephone assessment, Grace was instantly put at ease. Her assessor was told of her nervousness and remained professional yet personal. She detailed some of the concerns with her studies and was recommended different software to make it easier. Post assessment, Grace was surprised that everything was approved, and she would receive all that was recommended – to the point of asking what the catch was!

“If I had known it was going to be as easy as it was, I would have had the courage to apply at the start”.

Again, due to her anxiety, she contacted each of the organisations as soon as possible. Grace found this an easy process and only took a few weeks to set up. Out of the recommendations, the printing allowance has been incredibly helpful. It helps to print the assignments and read them on paper rather than on screen without her previous printing restrictions.

Mentoring has been regularly scheduled and gives Grace coping mechanisms for dealing with her anxiety and feelings of overwhelmedness with her course. Her mentor encourages her to contact her tutor for regular check-ins and actively ask for help on her assignments.

grace

Before receiving the DSA, Grace was on the verge of deferring again and considered quitting her course. She pushes herself to face the difficulties and feels accountable to the mentor, motivating her to do things she would ordinarily put aside. “Although I still struggle at times and still have my ups and downs, I know studying is good for my mental health, so I continue”.

Advice
“If I had known it was going to be as easy as it was, I would have had the courage to apply at the start”. Grace points out that although her anxiety and mental health is disabling, she wouldn’t necessarily see it as a disability. Success and failure are not always down to capability. The DSA is about having the resources to manage the difficulties some individuals face.

Case Studies: Grace

During the registration process, Grace noted that she suffered from depression and anxiety. The Disability services at the University contacted Grace and suggested that she apply for the DSA. Despite her struggles, to the point of deferring her course by a year, Grace didn’t feel it was necessary to apply for the DSA until her third year.

“With my depression, it leads to negative thinking, and I assumed the assessment would be a complete waste of my time”. Grace became very nervous and anxious about the assessment process, so she booked the next available appointment with A2B Assessments. Within minutes of her telephone assessment, Grace was instantly put at ease. Her assessor was told of her nervousness and remained professional yet personal. She detailed some of the concerns with her studies and was recommended different software to make it easier. Post assessment, Grace was surprised that everything was approved, and she would receive all that was recommended – to the point of asking what the catch was!

grace

Again, due to her anxiety, she contacted each of the organisations as soon as possible. Grace found this an easy process and only took a few weeks to set up. Out of the recommendations, the printing allowance has been incredibly helpful. It helps to print the assignments and read them on paper rather than on screen without her previous printing restrictions.

Mentoring has been regularly scheduled and gives Grace coping mechanisms for dealing with her anxiety and feelings of overwhelmedness with her course. Her mentor encourages her to contact her tutor for regular check-ins and actively ask for help on her assignments.

Before receiving the DSA, Grace was on the verge of deferring again and considered quitting her course. She pushes herself to face the difficulties and feels accountable to the mentor, motivating her to do things she would ordinarily put aside. “Although I still struggle at times and still have my ups and downs, I know studying is good for my mental health, so I continue”.

Advice
“If I had known it was going to be as easy as it was, I would have had the courage to apply at the start”. Grace points out that although her anxiety and mental health is disabling, she wouldn’t necessarily see it as a disability. Success and failure are not always down to capability. The DSA is about having the resources to manage the difficulties some individuals face.

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